Archive for the ‘Water’ Category

Climate Change in Bangladesh – BBC Photos

7 December, 2008

Bangladesh is one of the countries that will be worst affected by climate change. Rising sea and coastal water levels and more frequent storms threaten this low-lying country. Adapting Bangladesh to climate change is urgent – especially to prevent the reversal of recent progress in poverty reduction there.

An excellent set of pictures on the theme of climate change in Bangladesh can be seen at the BBC here.

BWPI will be undertaking with BRAC a new research programme on climate change and its implications for poverty in Bangladesh. Watch this space over the coming months. In the meantime check out the BWPI and CPRC working paper series for more on Bangladesh.

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A Fun Way to Harness the Energy of Children to Deliver Clean Water

12 November, 2008

In the discussion of my recent post about bottled water I mentioned that sales of bottled water at Manchester University support water pumps in Africa. Specifically, Playpump, a wonderful invention from South Africa.

As children spin on a roundabout, clean water is pumped from underground into storage tanks. The pumps cost about US$9,500 to install. They are much faster and pump at a more reliable rate than hand-driven pumps, and can supply up to 1,400 litres of water an hour.

Better water infrastructure in Africa not only reduces the incidence of the main water-borne illnesses, but also reduces the amount of time that communities spend collecting water from (often dirty) ponds and rivers. Since water collection is often an activity for girls, requiring them to walk many hours when water is inaccessible, it provides more time for them – including more time in school. More information on Playpump can be found here.

Bottled Water. To Buy or Not to Buy?

9 November, 2008

Too few people across the developing world have access to safe water. Too often they end up walking miles to unsafe water sources or, if they live in urban areas, purchasing water from expensive private sources. Safe water and sanitation are one of the main mechanisms to cut infant mortality from water borne diseases. Big donor and government investments are now underway (see the Asian Development Bank for instance).

Actress Thandie Newton explains in today’s FT why she is an ambassador of Volvic and World Vision’s campaign, in which Volvic supplies 10 litres of water in Africa for every litre of water bought in the UK (go here and to World Vision).

Frankly, I try to avoid bottled water whenever I can – costly and environmentally unfriendly. But if I have to buy – and have you tried to get water in an airport recently? what happened to the water fountains? – then Thandie’s rationale might persuade me to choose Volvic. She says:

“I wanted to see if my cynical attitude could be changed and World Vision did change it. Bottled water isn’t going to go away and so I’d rather there was a brand that donates large sums of money to genuinely valuable causes, and which creates philanthropic competition between brands. I’m not a blinkered purist. I know that by infiltrating these large corporations, I’m in a much better position to suggest changes. Right now, for example, I’m encouraging Volvic to switch to biodegradable containers”.

Fair point. In the meantime, can I have a glass of (tap) water please?